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Somalia - Telecoms, Mobile and Broadband - Statistics and Analyses

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Somalia's telecom market has been sustained despite tremendous difficulties. The country's economy has made it difficult to sustain investment in infrastructure, and the Al Shabaab Islamic militant group has on occasion forced the closure of internet services in many areas of the country. Furthermore, there has been a lack of guidance from a central government or sector regulatory entity since 1991, when a dictatorial regime was overthrown. However, some progress may be expected following the passing of the National Communications Law in October 2017, aimed at setting a legal and regulatory framework for the telecoms sector. The Law made provision for a National Communications Agency charged with encouraging market competition and overseeing the use of ICTs in promoting economic development. A Director for the Agency was appointed in 2018.

Through the anarchy which continues to disrupt the country, the telecoms market, dominated by the competitive mobile sector where seven networks compete for customers, has flourished. Some of these mobile services operators also offer fixed-line and internet services. Tariffs are among the lowest in Africa, and although the absence of regulation led to problems with frequency spectrum coordination and interconnection between networks these issues are to be addressed by the new telecom regulator.

The country's access to international submarine fibre optic cables was delayed until 2014, largely due to concerns resulting from piracy as well as to social difficulties and political anarchy. The landing of the first cable ended Somalia's dependence on expensive satellite connectivity for internet access. Consequently, Somalia's Internet Service Providers (ISPs) have been able to provide much improved services, though international bandwidth remains very limited. This is set to change with two key submarine cables: the 1,500km G2A cable (with a terrestrial connection to Addis Ababa in Ethiopia, expected to be ready for service at the end of 2018), and the 5,500km DARE cable.

There are also fibre-optic broadband links connecting Somalia across the Kenya border and linking to directly into Hormuud Telecom's network.

The forming of a new government in 2017 has given rise to hopes that the country may stabilise and become more attractive to foreign investment, which is needed to take the telecoms and broadband sector to the next level. The new government is beginning to regulate the sector and is planning to issue new spectrum licences that will allow the operation of high-speed mobile broadband technologies.

BuddeComm notes that the outbreak of the Coronavirus in 2020 is having a significant impact on production and supply chains globally. During the coming year the telecoms sector to various degrees is likely to experience a downturn in mobile device production, while it may also be difficult for network operators to manage workflows when maintaining and upgrading existing infrastructure. Overall progress towards 5G may be postponed or slowed down in some countries.

On the consumer side, spending on telecoms services and devices is under pressure from the financial effect of large-scale job losses and the consequent restriction on disposable incomes. However, the crucial nature of telecom services, both for general communication as well as a tool for home-working, will offset such pressures. In many markets the net effect should be a steady though reduced increased in subscriber growth.

Although it is challenging to predict and interpret the long-term impacts of the crisis as it develops, these have been acknowledged in the industry forecasts contained in this report.

The report also covers the responses of the telecom operators as well as government agencies and regulators as they react to the crisis to ensure that citizens can continue to make optimum use of telecom services. This can be reflected in subsidy schemes and the promotion of tele-health and tele-education, among other solutions.

Key developments:

Somtel launches LTE-A services;

National Communications Law passed to reform the telecoms sector;

Regulator opens consultation on the Unified Licensing Framework;

Government to set up an IXP in Mogadishu;

SomCable completes first stage of 1,200km terrestrial backbone network;

Contracts signed to build the DARE and G2A submarine cable systems;

Liquid Telecom builds the countrys first fibre-optic broadband link;

SEACOM cable lands in Somalia;

Three mobile operators agree to interconnect their networks;

Report includes Telecom Maturity Index charts and analyses, assessment of the global impact of COVID-19 on the telecoms sector, recent market developments.

Companies mentioned in this report:

Dalkom, Golis Telecom, Hormuud Telecom, Nationlink, Netco, Somafone, Somtel, Telcom Somalia, Telesom, Thuraya.

READ MORE

Table Of Content

Scope

1 Key statistics

2 Regional Africa Market Comparison

2.1 TMI vs GDP

2.2 Mobile and mobile broadband

2.3 Fixed and mobile broadband

3 Country overview

4 COVID-19 and its impact on the telecom sector

4.1 Economic considerations and responses

4.2 Mobile devices

4.3 Subscribers

4.4 Infrastructure

5 Telecommunications market

5.1 Market analysis

6 Regulatory environment

6.1 Historic overview

6.2 Regulatory authority

6.3 Unified licenses

7 Mobile market

7.1 Mobile statistics

7.2 Mobile broadband

7.3 Mobile infrastructure

7.4 Mobile content and applications

8 Broadband market

8.1 Market analysis

8.2 Broadband statistics

9 Telecommunications infrastructure

9.1 Overview of the national telecom network

9.2 National infrastructure developments

9.3 International infrastructure

10 Appendix Historic data

11 Related reports

Table 1 Top Level Country Statistics and Telco Authorities-Somalia 2019 (e)

Table 2 Growth in the number of mobile subscribers and penetration rate 2009 2024

Table 3 Growth in the number of active mobile broadband subscribers and penetration rate 2012 2024

Table 4 Growth in the number of fixed broadband subscribers 2012 2024

Table 5 Growth in the number of fixed lines in service and teledensity 2009 2024

Table 6 International bandwidth 2012-2017

Table 7 Historic-Mobile subscribers and penetration rate 2000 2009

Table 8 Historic-Internet users and penetration rate 1999 2015

Table 9 Historic-Fixed lines in service and teledensity 1999 2009

Chart 1 Overall Africa view-Telecoms Maturity Index vs GDP per Capita 2018

Chart 2 North Africa-Telecoms Maturity Index vs GDP per Capita 2018

Chart 3 Africa Middle-tier Telecoms Maturity Index (Market Challengers) 2018

Chart 4 North Africa Telecoms Maturity Index by country 2018

Chart 5 North Africa mobile subscriber penetration versus mobile broadband penetration 2018

Chart 6 North Africa fixed and mobile penetration rates 2018

Chart 7 Growth in the number of mobile subscribers and penetration rate 2009 2024

Chart 8 Growth in the number of active mobile broadband subscribers and penetration rate 2009 2024

Chart 9 Growth in the number of fixed broadband subscribers and penetration rate 2009 2024

Chart 10 Growth in the number of fixed lines in service and teledensity 2009 2024

Exhibit 1 Generalised Market Characteristics by Market Segment

Exhibit 2 North Africa-Key Characteristics of Telecoms Markets by Country

Exhibit 3 Map of Somalia and Somaliland

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Products and Companies

Products

paul budde communication, buddecomm, telecomunications research, country profile, emerging market, Companies (Major Players), Internet, Mobile & Wireless Broadband and Media, Mobile Communications (voice and infrastructure), Regulations & Government Policies, Strategies & Analyses (Industry & Markets), Telecoms Infrastructure, Africa, Somalia


Companies

Dalkom, Golis Telecom, Hormuud Telecom, Nationlink, Netco, Somafone, Somtel, Telcom Somalia, Telesom, Thuraya.

Company Profile

Company Profile Title

Somalia's telecom market has been sustained despite tremendous difficulties. The country's economy has made it difficult to sustain investment in infrastructure, and the Al Shabaab Islamic militant group has on occasion forced the closure of internet services in many areas of the country. Furthermore, there has been a lack of guidance from a central government or sector regulatory entity since 1991, when a dictatorial regime was overthrown. However, some progress may be expected following the passing of the National Communications Law in October 2017, aimed at setting a legal and regulatory framework for the telecoms sector. The Law made provision for a National Communications Agency charged with encouraging market competition and overseeing the use of ICTs in promoting economic development. A Director for the Agency was appointed in 2018.

Through the anarchy which continues to disrupt the country, the telecoms market, dominated by the competitive mobile sector where seven networks compete for customers, has flourished. Some of these mobile services operators also offer fixed-line and internet services. Tariffs are among the lowest in Africa, and although the absence of regulation led to problems with frequency spectrum coordination and interconnection between networks these issues are to be addressed by the new telecom regulator.

The country's access to international submarine fibre optic cables was delayed until 2014, largely due to concerns resulting from piracy as well as to social difficulties and political anarchy. The landing of the first cable ended Somalia's dependence on expensive satellite connectivity for internet access. Consequently, Somalia's Internet Service Providers (ISPs) have been able to provide much improved services, though international bandwidth remains very limited. This is set to change with two key submarine cables: the 1,500km G2A cable (with a terrestrial connection to Addis Ababa in Ethiopia, expected to be ready for service at the end of 2018), and the 5,500km DARE cable.

There are also fibre-optic broadband links connecting Somalia across the Kenya border and linking to directly into Hormuud Telecom's network.

The forming of a new government in 2017 has given rise to hopes that the country may stabilise and become more attractive to foreign investment, which is needed to take the telecoms and broadband sector to the next level. The new government is beginning to regulate the sector and is planning to issue new spectrum licences that will allow the operation of high-speed mobile broadband technologies.

BuddeComm notes that the outbreak of the Coronavirus in 2020 is having a significant impact on production and supply chains globally. During the coming year the telecoms sector to various degrees is likely to experience a downturn in mobile device production, while it may also be difficult for network operators to manage workflows when maintaining and upgrading existing infrastructure. Overall progress towards 5G may be postponed or slowed down in some countries.

On the consumer side, spending on telecoms services and devices is under pressure from the financial effect of large-scale job losses and the consequent restriction on disposable incomes. However, the crucial nature of telecom services, both for general communication as well as a tool for home-working, will offset such pressures. In many markets the net effect should be a steady though reduced increased in subscriber growth.

Although it is challenging to predict and interpret the long-term impacts of the crisis as it develops, these have been acknowledged in the industry forecasts contained in this report.

The report also covers the responses of the telecom operators as well as government agencies and regulators as they react to the crisis to ensure that citizens can continue to make optimum use of telecom services. This can be reflected in subsidy schemes and the promotion of tele-health and tele-education, among other solutions.

Key developments:

Somtel launches LTE-A services;

National Communications Law passed to reform the telecoms sector;

Regulator opens consultation on the Unified Licensing Framework;

Government to set up an IXP in Mogadishu;

SomCable completes first stage of 1,200km terrestrial backbone network;

Contracts signed to build the DARE and G2A submarine cable systems;

Liquid Telecom builds the countrys first fibre-optic broadband link;

SEACOM cable lands in Somalia;

Three mobile operators agree to interconnect their networks;

Report includes Telecom Maturity Index charts and analyses, assessment of the global impact of COVID-19 on the telecoms sector, recent market developments.

Companies mentioned in this report:

Dalkom, Golis Telecom, Hormuud Telecom, Nationlink, Netco, Somafone, Somtel, Telcom Somalia, Telesom, Thuraya.

READ MORE

Scope

1 Key statistics

2 Regional Africa Market Comparison

2.1 TMI vs GDP

2.2 Mobile and mobile broadband

2.3 Fixed and mobile broadband

3 Country overview

4 COVID-19 and its impact on the telecom sector

4.1 Economic considerations and responses

4.2 Mobile devices

4.3 Subscribers

4.4 Infrastructure

5 Telecommunications market

5.1 Market analysis

6 Regulatory environment

6.1 Historic overview

6.2 Regulatory authority

6.3 Unified licenses

7 Mobile market

7.1 Mobile statistics

7.2 Mobile broadband

7.3 Mobile infrastructure

7.4 Mobile content and applications

8 Broadband market

8.1 Market analysis

8.2 Broadband statistics

9 Telecommunications infrastructure

9.1 Overview of the national telecom network

9.2 National infrastructure developments

9.3 International infrastructure

10 Appendix Historic data

11 Related reports

Table 1 Top Level Country Statistics and Telco Authorities-Somalia 2019 (e)

Table 2 Growth in the number of mobile subscribers and penetration rate 2009 2024

Table 3 Growth in the number of active mobile broadband subscribers and penetration rate 2012 2024

Table 4 Growth in the number of fixed broadband subscribers 2012 2024

Table 5 Growth in the number of fixed lines in service and teledensity 2009 2024

Table 6 International bandwidth 2012-2017

Table 7 Historic-Mobile subscribers and penetration rate 2000 2009

Table 8 Historic-Internet users and penetration rate 1999 2015

Table 9 Historic-Fixed lines in service and teledensity 1999 2009

Chart 1 Overall Africa view-Telecoms Maturity Index vs GDP per Capita 2018

Chart 2 North Africa-Telecoms Maturity Index vs GDP per Capita 2018

Chart 3 Africa Middle-tier Telecoms Maturity Index (Market Challengers) 2018

Chart 4 North Africa Telecoms Maturity Index by country 2018

Chart 5 North Africa mobile subscriber penetration versus mobile broadband penetration 2018

Chart 6 North Africa fixed and mobile penetration rates 2018

Chart 7 Growth in the number of mobile subscribers and penetration rate 2009 2024

Chart 8 Growth in the number of active mobile broadband subscribers and penetration rate 2009 2024

Chart 9 Growth in the number of fixed broadband subscribers and penetration rate 2009 2024

Chart 10 Growth in the number of fixed lines in service and teledensity 2009 2024

Exhibit 1 Generalised Market Characteristics by Market Segment

Exhibit 2 North Africa-Key Characteristics of Telecoms Markets by Country

Exhibit 3 Map of Somalia and Somaliland

• Single User Licences (for access by one person),
• 10 User Licences (for access for up to 10 Users),
• 20 User Licences (for access for up to 20 Users), and
• Site Licences (allow access by all staff within the country of purchase).

To know more information on Purchase by Section, please send a mail to support@kenresearch.com

INQUIRE FOR COVID-19 IMPACT ANALYSIS

Products

paul budde communication, buddecomm, telecomunications research, country profile, emerging market, Companies (Major Players), Internet, Mobile & Wireless Broadband and Media, Mobile Communications (voice and infrastructure), Regulations & Government Policies, Strategies & Analyses (Industry & Markets), Telecoms Infrastructure, Africa, Somalia


Companies

Dalkom, Golis Telecom, Hormuud Telecom, Nationlink, Netco, Somafone, Somtel, Telcom Somalia, Telesom, Thuraya.